Tag Archives: working well with a disability

RTC:Rural celebrates Disability Employment Month

The right talent, right now. National Disability Employment Awareness Month. #NDEAM. dol.gov/odep

October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month! RTC:Rural joins with many others to celebrate the contributions of workers with disabilities. We are pleased to highlight the work being done to support people with disabilities in rural communities as they work towards achieving their employment goals.

Barriers to Rural Employment

A man using a wheelchair working at a grocery store.

For people with disabilities who live in rural areas, job opportunities are limited. There are physical barriers, such as inaccessible buildings and no accessible transportation, and also attitudinal barriers, such as negative stereotypes and discrimination. These barriers often keep people with disabilities from participating how they want in work, school, and community life. These barriers also contribute to increased social and economic inequality between people with and without disabilities.

Benefits of Employment

Employment has obvious economic benefits, but it also is important because it helps people participate in their communities and increases their overall well-being. Research shows that people with disabilities who are employed report that they participate more in their communities. They also feel more socially connected to other people.

For more on RTC:Rural’s recent research in this topic area, see “RTC:Rural researchers publish paper on rural/urban differences in social connectedness and perceived isolation for people with disabilities.”

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Become a certified Working Well with a Disability facilitator – register now!

Man in wheelchair with friends

[Image description: three men are outside talking and smiling. Two give each other a high-five. Probably because they appreciate good ‘dad-jokes’ as much as we do.]

Evergreens might not mind winter, but for all the other trees, spring is a great re-leaf!

Cultivate some ‘new growth’ in employment for people with disabilities by providing Working Well with a Disability!

Registration for the April 2019 Working Well with a Disability online facilitator training is now open. The training will take place the week of April 22nd. Space is limited, so please only register if you know you can attend.

Registration closes on April 15th, 2019.

 


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Facilitators share rural barriers to participation in Living & Working Well programs in Peer-to-Peer Series call

A circle of clip art people surrounds the Living and Working Well with a Disability logo, Peer-to-Peer Series written underneath.Residents in rural areas can face many challenges and barriers to accessing services and programs, such as those offered by Centers for Independent Living (CILs). For many Centers that are located in or that serve rural communities, these barriers can mean low participation, which in turn can make it difficult to continue offering certain programs beyond core services. On the most recent Living and Working Well Facilitator Peer-to-Peer call, program facilitators discussed barriers to participation in their workshops such as fewer (or no) transportation options, competition for time, insufficient infrastructure, lack of supporting resources, and fewer outreach and recruitment opportunities. Continue reading

RTC:Rural Supports Disability Employment Month

A man operates an ice cream truck at an outdoor farmers market. He is an amputee.

Picture from Healthy Community Living (www.healthycommunityliving.com).

October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month, and RTC:Rural is celebrating efforts to support people with disabilities in rural communities as they work towards achieving their employment goals.

In addition to the economic benefits of employment, it is an important predictor of community participation and well-being. However, for people with disabilities, and especially in rural areas, employment is not always accessible. Not only are there physical barriers, such as inaccessible buildings and transportation, but there are also societal and attitudinal barriers. These barriers keep people with disabilities disconnected from important activities such as work, school, and community life, and contribute to increased social and economic inequality. Employment is one factor that helps to increase community participation. People who are employed report higher levels of community participation and feeling more socially connected than those who are not employed.

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Living and Working Well with a Disability Facilitators: Register today for Peer-to-Peer Call #3!

Peer-to-Peer Series Call #3 invitation. See text for full description.

Register today for the next Living & Working Well with a Disability Facilitator Peer-to-Peer Series Call! Registration link is below.

Mark your calendars— the third Peer-to-Peer Series conference call for Living and Working Well with a Disability Facilitators is scheduled for October 25, 2018, at 11 a.m. MT. The call topic is Challenges and Successes for Rural Participants. These calls are free and open to any Living and Working Well facilitators, though registration is preferred. Continue reading

Register now for the September Working Well with a Disability facilitator training

 

Working Well with a Disability

a bag of small pumpkins and squash

Fall is just around the corner. That means back to school, changing leaves, pumpkin spice-flavored everything and… Working Well with a Disability Facilitator Training!

Registration for the September 2018 Working Well with a Disability online facilitator training is now open. The training will take place the week of September 17th.

Space is limited, so please only register if you know you can attend. Registration closes on September 10th, 2018.

Working Well with a Disability Facilitator Training Details

Three women sit at a table. Training dates: September 17th – 21st. Training includes online self-study and discussion participation and a live webinar on September 21st.

Total time required: 8-10 hours (estimate) over 5 business days, in addition to time to read the Working Well manual.

Cost: $130 per person. Cost includes a manual in your preferred format.

Registration deadline: September 10th

How to register: Visit Working Well September 2018 Training Pre-Registration Continue reading

“This is a great forum for us to all talk and learn:” Second Living/Working Well Facilitator Peer-to-Peer Series Call a Success

A circle of clip art people surrounds the Living and Working Well with a Disability logo, Peer-to-Peer Series written underneath.RTC:Rural’s second Peer-to-Peer Series call for Living Well and Working Well with a Disability Facilitators was held on June 28th, 2018. Twenty-two participants joined the conference call and shared their experiences, challenges, and successes as facilitators. The topic of the second call was program implementation, recruitment, and sustainability.

Facilitation skill-building is not the only thing to consider when planning a Living or Working Well workshop in your community. The programs require attention to the needs and capacity of your organization, as well as the needs and interests of participants. Continue reading

Living and Working Well with a Disability Facilitators: Register today for Peer-to-Peer Call #2!

Text description below.

Register today for the next Living & Working Well with a Disability Facilitator Peer-to-Peer Series Call! Registration link is below.

Mark your calendars— the second Peer-to-Peer Series conference call for Living and Working Well with a Disability Facilitators is scheduled for June 28, 2018, at 11 a.m. MT. The call topic is implementation, recruitment, and sustainability. These calls are free and open to any Living and Working Well facilitators, though registration is preferred. Continue reading

“We’re here to help each other live better with our disabilities:” First Living/Working Well Facilitator Peer-to-Peer Series Call a Success

A circle of clip art people surrounds the Living and Working Well with a Disability logo, Peer-to-Peer Series written underneath. RTC:Rural’s new Peer-to-Peer Series call for Living Well and Working Well with a Disability Facilitators was held on April 26, 2018. Twenty-six participants joined the conference call and shared their experiences, challenges, and successes as facilitators. The topic of the first call was managing group dynamics.

“A key difference between facilitating and teaching is that as a facilitator, you are not placing yourself in the position of expert or leader,” said RTC:Rural Training Associate Maggie Lawrence, who organized the call. “Facilitators help to guide the session and keep on track, but the control of the curriculum is given to the group. This means that the workshop sessions are heavy on discussion and peer support, and therefore each group can have a different feel and different dynamics.” Continue reading

RTC:Rural starts new Living & Working Well Facilitator Peer-to-Peer Series

Image of Peer-to-Peer Series email invitation. Text description in caption.

RTC:Rural Presents: Living & Working Well Facilitator Peer-to-Peer Series. First call topic: Managing Group Dynamics. A one-hour national conference call to bring together facilitators so we can share knowledge, experiences, and ideas! April 26, 2018. 11 a.m. MT.

Beginning on April 26, RTC:Rural is hosting a new Peer-to-Peer Series for Living and Working Well with a Disability facilitators. These one-hour conference calls are open to all facilitators who are involved in these programs, and there is no cost to participate.

“I started the series because there is so much rich knowledge and experience in this community of facilitators, but there are not very many ways for people in this community to connect and share that knowledge,” said Maggie Lawrence, RTC:Rural Training Associate, who trains Living & Working Well facilitators and provides technical assistance for the Living & Working Well programs. “I see this call series as a platform for facilitators to share experiences, stories, skills, questions, successes, and challenges; everyone is an expert, and everyone is a learner.” Continue reading