Tag Archives: mobility impairment

RTC:Rural Housing Research Brief explores how housing impacts participation

Screen shot of the cover of the research brief "Life starts at home: exploring how housing impacts participation for people with disabilities."

RTC:Rural recently published a new Research Brief that shares current housing research.

To view and download the Research Brief, click here: Life starts at home: Exploring how housing impacts participation for people with disabilities


 

Housing and Community Participation

How a space is organized shapes how you use that space. There have been many studies on how the built environment, which includes everything from roads and sidewalks to buildings and parking lots, impacts how people move through and engage with their community. We know that physical barriers in the community, such as stairs, curbs, narrow building entrances, broken sidewalks, and long travel routes can prevent people with mobility impairments from accessing community spaces and limits their ability to move around their community independently.

By removing these barriers, people with disabilities have more opportunities to do things like buy groceries, attend school, be employed, go to the doctor, and socialize or recreate as they wish. Fewer barriers in the environment can mean more opportunities for community participation. Continue reading

New project will study “Effort Capacity and Choice”

A woman in a wheelchair with a shopping basket in her lap reaches up for a box on a shelf.The RTC: Rural at the University of Montana’s Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities (RIIC) is pleased to announce a new collaborative project with the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) and the New Directions Wellness Center at the School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science at the University of Montana. Our project, funded by a three-year, $600,000 grant from NIDILRR, will focus on understanding how personal effort influences community participation.

Previous research by the RIIC has shown that for those with mobility impairments, bathing required the largest expenditure of daily energy. Each person has a finite amount of energy to expend in a single day, and if a disproportionately large amount of that energy is required for any one activity, such as bathing, less energy remains for other activities, such as grocery shopping or socializing with friends. “The things we do are shaped by time and money, but also by the amount of energy we have,” says Andrew Myers, RTC: Rural Project Director. Continue reading