Tag Archives: health promotion

Living Well Intro Webinar videos now available

:ogo for Living Well with a Disability

Unable to attend the Living Well Intro webinar we hosted on August 24, or want to review the information covered? Then you’re in luck—the video recordings are now available to view online. There are two recordings from the webinar:

Program overview portion of webinar

The first webinar recording features RTC:Rural Training Associate Maggie Lawrence giving an introduction to the Living Well with a Disability (LWD) program. In the video, she introduces LWD program content and the Living Well Facilitator Training website. She also explains the process for an organization to become a licensed program provider and for staff to become consumer workshop facilitators.

View the LWD Program Overview video here: Living Well with a Disability Intro Webinar: Program Overview

Guest speakers portion of webinar

The second recording features three guest speakers who describe implementing LWD at their CILs: Bert Rios, Outreach Coordinator at S.M.I.L.E. in Yuma, Arizona; Dermot Thiel, Program Director at Wyoming Independent Living in Laramie, Wyoming; and Jude Monson, Program Manager at Summit Independent Living in Missoula, Montana.

The speakers share their insights and experiences of using the LWD program with their organizations, and answer questions from webinar participants about their variations on implementing the program. Rios, Thiel, and Monson each have years of experience implementing the Living Well program with diverse populations and offer their perspectives on program impact, adaptability and sustainability.

View the Guest Speaker video here: Living Well with a Disability Intro Webinar: Guest Speakers Continue reading

Become a certified Working Well with a Disability facilitator- register now!

Working Well with a Disability

September means back to school, changing leaves, pumpkin spice-flavored everything and… Working Well with a Disability Facilitator Training!

Registration for the September 2017 Working Well with a Disability online facilitator training is now open. The training will take place the week of September 18. Space is limited, so please only register if you know you can attend. Registration closes on September 11, 2017.

Working Well with a Disability Facilitator Training Details

Training dates: Sept. 18-22. Training includes online self-study and discussion participation and a live webinar on Sept. 22.

Total time required: 8-10 hours (estimate) over 5 business days, in addition to time to read the Working Well manual.

Cost: $130 per person. Cost includes a manual in your preferred format.

Registration deadline: Sept. 11

How to register: Visit Working Well Sept. 2017 Training Registration

After registration, you will receive an email containing a training schedule, a training overview, and the link with instructions to finalize your registration and payment.

Once you’ve registered, you should also have your agency review and agree to the Organizational Licensing Agreement, which is found here: Working Well Organizational Licensing Agreement Continue reading

August 24 Webinar: Learn More About Our Living Well with a Disability Program

:ogo for Living Well with a Disability

Mark your calendars for the August 24th webinar about our successful Living Well with a Disability program! The webinar will be presented by RTC:Rural staff and feature guest speaker Bert Rios of S.M.I.L.E. in Yuma, AZ.

Living Well Intro Webinar

This Living Well Intro webinar is designed to provide an introduction to the Living Well with a Disability (LWD) program. It will be held on August 24, 2017, from 10:00- 11:30 a.m. Mountain Time.

Living Well Intro will introduce LWD program content and the Living Well Facilitator Training website. It will also explain the process for an organization to become a licensed program provider and for staff to become consumer workshop facilitators, and conclude with implementation success stories. Several guest speakers who have experience implementing the program at their CILs will be presenting, including: Bert Rios from S.M.I.L.E. in Yuma, Arizona who will speak about implementing Living Well with youth; Dermot Thiel, Program Director at Wyoming Independent Living in Laramie, Wyoming; and Jude Monson, Program Manager at Summit Independent Living in Missoula, Montana.

Registration

To register, please follow the link below: Living Well Intro Webinar Registration | August 24, 2017, 10:00- 11:30 a.m. Mountain Time

This webinar will be closed-captioned, and a recording will be made available. For accessibility requests, please email livingwell@ruralinstitute.umt.edu. Continue reading

Consumer interviews add to Participatory Curriculum Development project

Man sitting in a wheelchair in front of several bikes hanging on the wall, talking and gesturing

Photo of an interview with Joe Stone collected for the Healthy Community Living project – an example of some of the multi-media we are collecting as part of our participatory process to make this curriculum more engaging and useful. You can view the video of the interview below.

Healthy Community Living, one of RTC:Rural’s current projects, is developing a multi-media health promotion program to improve the health and wellbeing of people with disabilities. Have you ever wondered how we work with partners and consumers on a project like this? We call the process “Participatory Curriculum Development” and this blog post gives you an insider view of what that means!

Our project is currently working with eight Centers for Independent Living (CILs) using a Participatory Curriculum Development (PCD) procedure to create and adapt two curricula. The two project development teams consist of experienced CIL staff, peer experts in independent living philosophy, and staff members from the Associated Programs of Rural Independent Living (APRIL) and RTC:Rural.

While multi-media is a good way to represent and enhance the concepts and ideas in the content, it must also be interesting and engaging for the program user.  However, there are not many photos, videos and other media that accurately represent people with disabilities in real life settings. To overcome and change this, the development teams are using the PCD process to access existing media, create new media themselves, and engage CIL consumers in the process. This means that the content created for Healthy Community Living truly represents Real People in Real Places.

Although finding or creating media may sound simple in the age of the internet and digital technology, the process for creating multi-media content is a bit more challenging than one might think. The first step is to outline content for each curriculum. This includes identifying areas within the curriculum where multi-media presentations can enhance the content and make it more interesting and engaging.

Continue reading

UM undergrad presents Facebook data for RTC:Rural participatory health promotion project

Student pointing to her research poster, in the poster hall at a conference.

Megan Miller presents her poster, which features her work on RTC:Rural’s Healthy Community Living project, on April 28, 2017 as part of the University of Montana Conference on Undergraduate Research.

On Friday, April 28, 2017, undergraduate student researcher Megan Miller presented a poster titled “Analysis of Factors Contributing to a Facebook Presence” at the 16th annual University of Montana Conference on Undergraduate Research.  Miller is a junior psychology major at the University of Montana, and completed the project with RTC:Rural for independent research credit during the 2016/2017 school year.

Miller’s research is part of a broader project at RTC:Rural called Healthy Community Living (HCL).  She worked closely with the HCL project leaders to develop and carry out her research over the course of the school year. HCL is part of a five year grant to produce an innovative online multi-media health promotion program. Using a participatory curriculum development process, RTC:Rural researchers are working closely with partners at Centers for Independent Living and advisors around the country, as well as individuals with disabilities, to develop and test curriculum material.

A beginning step for Miller was figuring out how to attract followers to the HCL Facebook page, which is being used to engage and involve people with disabilities, community members, and service providers in the creation and refinement of HCL’s health promotion curriculum. Specifically, the HCL Facebook page is a tool to collect input on specific curriculum content, as well as to curate a collection of photographic and video media for inclusion in the online program. Continue reading

RTC:Rural presents research at NARRTC 2017 “Taking Charge of Change”

RTC:Rural staff member presenting at a conference

RTC:Rural researcher presenting at a conference

In April 2017, RTC:Rural researchers presented three current research projects at the 2017 NARRTC conference, held this year in Alexandria, Virginia.

This conference provides an annual opportunity for grantees of the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) to come together and share their latest research findings.  Training and knowledge translation methodologies and results are also shared. The 2017 theme is “Taking Charge of Change.”

Projects presented aim to enhance interventions, programs or systems to improve the lives of people with disabilities. These research projects fall into the priority categories of Community Participation & Independent Living, Employment & Vocational Rehabilitation, Health & Wellness, and Knowledge Translation.

RTC:Rural was on the agenda with two presentations and one poster:

1. Using Participatory Curriculum Development as an Integrated Knowledge Translation Strategy (Presentation)

Authors: Dr. Craig Ravesloot, Ph.D., Tracy Boehm Barrett, M.P.H., Tannis Hargrove, M.S., Mary Olson, MSW

Self-management and health promotion remain a significant challenge for people with disabilities living in rural areas. Online learning is a promising avenue to make evidence-based programs available to people, yet the best approaches to implementing online content for rural people with disabilities are unknown.

To establish these best approaches, RTC:Rural is partnering with stakeholders from the Association of Programs for Rural Independent Living (APRIL) and eight Centers for Independent Living across the country to develop two health promotion programs that blend online and face-to-face learning. These programs are based on the Living Well with a Disability program. Continue reading

New Online Training Platform Enhances Living Well with a Disability Program

Screenshot of new Living Well with a Disability websiteRTC:Rural is thrilled to announce an exciting update to the Living Well with a Disability Program with a new online Facilitator Training. The new program updates  make it easier for organizations to train staff and peers, prepare workshop materials, and receive technical support from both RTC:Rural and fellow Living Well with a Disability Program Providers.

After several months of planning, collaboration, and development with key stakeholders, skilled professionals, and multi-media experts, we are proud to share the beautiful new online learning experience to continue our long history of providing this evidence-based health promotion program for people with disabilities. Continue reading

Living Well with a Disability featured in CDC awareness campaign

:ogo for Living Well with a DisabilityLogo for Self Management Education programWe are honored to have our Living Well with a Disability (LWD) program featured in a targeted awareness campaign sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The six-month campaign Self-Management Education: Learn More. Feel Better. is being conducted in Wisconsin to promote self-management education (SME) as a tool to manage chronic health conditions.

Self-management education has been proven to reduce symptoms of chronic conditions and to improve overall quality of life. Research by RTC:Rural suggests that implementing SME programs, specifically LWD, could save millions of dollars in Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance costs and is a promising intervention that has demonstrated improvements in health-related quality of life and health care use. However, many of the public are unaware of available SME programs, and the CDC’s Learn More. Feel Better. campaign aims to bridge this information gap.

According to 2014 American Community Survey data, the rate of disability across the United States is 12.4%. In rural America, that percentage increases to 17.7%. Overall, people living in rural areas are more likely to be unemployed, living in poverty, elderly, or experience a disability, and as a result are more likely to qualify for Medicare/Medicaid.

LWD is one of the six SME programs featured on the Disability-Specific SME Programs campaign website. The CDC has been involved with LWD since its initial development at RTC:Rural in 1987, and has continued to provide funding, support, and promotion of the program at various levels throughout the years. Most recently, RTC:Rural received funding to continue the LWD Program’s history of research and development under a five year grant to translate it into a state-of-the-art online health promotion curriculum. This grant funding is provided by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) within the Administration for Community Living, at the US Department of Health and Human Services.

LWD is a 10 week peer-facilitated workshop focusing on the health-management needs of people with disabilities, and is currently offered in 46 states by over 250 Centers for Independent Living and internationally. Continue reading

RTC:Rural “Health My Way” App being designed to increase health and wellness for people in rural communities

App icon for RTC:Rural's "Health My Way" app, which is currently under development

App icon for RTC:Rural’s “Health My Way” app, which is currently under development

One of RTC:Rural’s current projects aims to develop and test a new health-related app called “Health My Way.”

The app is being produced as part of the Ecological Decision Support for Health Promotion project led by project manager Tannis Hargrove, M.S.  The app provides a solution for individuals who live in rural areas and are unable to participate in group workshops on healthy living due to limited transportation or lack of other resources.

The idea and content for the app came from two of RTC:Rural’s previous projects. The first, Living Well With a Disability (LWD), is a health-promotion program that helps participants set and reach quality-of-life goals by developing a healthy lifestyle. The LWD program especially aims to help participants manage secondary health conditions. LWD is a 10- to 12-week program facilitated by a trained workshop facilitator who leads weekly meetings for the group.

The second project, Consumer Self-Managed Use of Rural Healthcare Services (CASM), helped participants connect to available healthcare services in their communities. CASM used some of the goal-setting and health-management content from the LWD program and addressed how to overcome specific barriers to using those resources.

“Health My Way” was developed to provide an alternative for those individuals who could not participate in the LWD program due to logistical or personal challenges.  This tool is especially important for those living in rural communities where the cost and accessibility of transportation can be substantial barriers to participation. The app is meant to be completed one-on-one with a staff member from a local Center for Independent Living, which involves more flexibility in location and time than is afforded by the LWD group meetings. Continue reading