Maps of Disability and Employment

September 2016

The maps below explore the 2010-2014 ACS 5-year year (table C18120) employment estimates by disability and county type (OMB county classifications). The ACS asks a set of disability indicator questions to determine disability, if a respondent can answer “yes” to any disability question they are classified as having a disability. The data below are for ages 18-64.

This is a map of the United States which depicts employment rates among people with disabilities by county.Map 12. Employment rates among people with disabilities in America by county. This map of the United States depicts employment rates among people with disabilities by county. Employment rates are predominantly higher in the Alaska and the great plains and rocky mountain regions including Minnesota, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, and parts of western Oklahoma and west Texas. Employment rates are slightly lower along the Pacific Coast states and the New England region and significantly lower in the South.

 

This is a map of the United States which depicts employment rates among people with disabilities by county.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map 13. Unemployment rates among people with disabilities in America by county. This map of the United States depicts unemployment rates among people with disabilities by county. Unemployment rates are higher throughout much of Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Midwestern states and varied throughout the rest of the U.S. However, it is important to consider unemployment rates in addition to out of the labor force rates.

 

This is a map of the United States which depicts out of labor force rates among people with disabilities by county.Map 14. Out of labor force rates among people with disabilities in America by county. This map of the United States depicts out of labor force rates among people with disabilities by county. Rates of people with disabilities no longer in the labor force are extremely higher throughout large sections of the South, especially in Kentucky, West Virginia, Mississippi, and Alabama. Rates are lower throughout the great plains and rocky mountain regions such as Wyoming, North Dakota and South Dakota.

 

 

This work is part of the Geography of Disability Project.