CAARE- Outdoor Events

Community Assessment for Accessible Rural Events

Planning a community picnic, arts festival or a rodeo? Here are some things you should consider as you plan your outdoor event.


Parking

Accessible parking spot in front of a lake.

Not only is accessible parking necessary for people with disabilities, having a clearly marked passenger drop-off area and clear pathways to entrances makes it easier for older people and for people with small children in strollers to get into your event.

Accommodation considerations:Link to more information:
Enough accessible parking
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit
Accessible parking is clearly marked
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Event Accessibility Checklist
Passenger drop-off area near accessible entrance
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Event Accessibility Checklist

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities
Level and unobstructed pathways from parking area to entrance
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities

Bathrooms

A person uses an adaptive bike in front of an accessible outdoor restroom.

Everyone needs to be able to have a restroom they can easily access and use. Make sure bathrooms have clear signs, and are easy to get to.

Accessibility considerations:Link to more information:
Accessible bathrooms onsite
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities

Event Accessibility Checklist
Clear signage for accessible bathrooms
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities

Event Accessibility Checklist
Path to bathroom unobstructed and wheelchair accessible
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities

Event Accessibility Checklist

Walkways

A woman using a walker walks down an accessible surface on the beach between two rows of flags.

Accessible walkways benefit everyone, not just people with disabilities. Parents with strollers or small children, older adults, people carrying bags or transporting equipment, and other groups will also appreciate having safe and unblocked walkways.

Accessibility considerations:Link to more information:
Clear and unobstructed pathways to all activities and services
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities

Event Accessibility Checklist
Handrails on each side of all stairs
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities
Ramps at all steps or uneven surfaces
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities
In places with no curb cuts, ramps are present
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities
Challenging surfaces, such as sand, loose dirt, grass, gravel, have an accessible pathway across them

Service Animals

Some people who use service animals also use mobility equipment, such as a wheelchair or scooter. Make sure service animal areas are also accessible for mobility equipment users.

Accessibility considerations:Link to more information:
Accessible toileting area
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Event Accessibility Checklist
Water bowls
Adequate space in sitting areas for service animals

Programming

A large group of people seated in a small outdoor arena. In the front row are people using wheelchairs and power chairs, and a person with a stroller for their baby.

Even if the mayor thinks they can yell loud enough that everyone in the stands can hear them, they should still use a microphone. Especially at outdoor events, there is always competing background noise. Using properly adjusted microphones allow everyone at the event to hear what the speaker has to say.

(And besides, no one likes yelling anyway).

Accessibility considerations:Links to more information:
All video presentations have closed captioning
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities
Interpreters for any needed language, including ASL, available for all activities
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities
All media and materials are in accessible formats
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities
Hearing assistance technology is available
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities
Microphones for audience during Q&A sessions
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit 

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities

Seating and Tables

Two people, one in a wheelchair, visit a booth at an outdoor event.

Make sure everyone has a comfortable place to sit where they can still participate in the event if they choose. Make sure vendor booths are at a height that people using wheelchairs or other mobility equipment can easily view and reach the booth.

Accessibility considerations:Link to more information:
Clear and accessible signs leading to tables, displays, and presentations
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities
Accessible seating set up in a way that is inclusive
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities
Front row seating for people with vision and hearing impairments
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit
ASL interpreters are visible to all attendees
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities

Event Accessibility Checklist
Tables are at the appropriate height and have enough space for people using wheelchairs and scooters
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit
Materials and/or food are at a height accessible for people using wheelchairs or scooters
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

Self-assessment tool for ensuring access for people with disabilities

Event Accessibility Checklist

Meals

A group of people gathered around a picnic table in a park. Some of them are using wheelchairs, and one man is an amputee.

It’s all about the food! Sharing meals together are an important part of many community events. It’s important to make sure that everyone is included at the table- and that they can get to the table.

Accessibility considerations:Link to more information:
Chairs with arms available
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit
Specialty diets and food sensitivities are accommodated
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit
Labels and allergy warnings are clear and obvious
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit
Food that can be eaten without utensils is available
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit
Seating is separate from the food serving area, and able to be rearranged
Planning accessible meetings and events: A toolkit

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Community Assessment for Accessible Rural Events