University of Montana Rural Institute

Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities – RTC: Rural

The Executive Summary and Research Summary document covers. Both say "Research that Leads to Solutions for Rural Americans with Disabilities," and feature images of a map of disability rates by county across the US. The Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities (RTC: Rural) conducts research on disability as part of the Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities at the University of Montana.

RTC: Rural is funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) to improve the ability of people with disabilities to engage in rural community living.

Read our 2-page Executive Summary: RTC:Rural- Research that Leads to Solutions for Rural Americans with Disabilities (PDF)

Read our 10-page Research Summary: RTC:Rural Research Summary_2017 (PDF)

As a NIDILRR-funded program, the Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities strives to ensure people with disabilities participate in all stages of the development and implementation of research projects.  Our goal is to make sure research results and products are useful and relevant to people with disabilities, their families and service providers.

Learn more about RTC: Rural, our staff and history by checking out our About Page. Please like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.


    Working Well with a Disability facilitator training: register now!

    Working Well with a Disability

    Registration for the February 2020 Working Well with a Disability online facilitator training is now open. The training will take place over eight days, starting the week of February 3. Space is limited, so please only register if you know you can attend. Registration closes on January 20th, 2020.


    Working Well with a Disability Facilitator Training Details

    Training dates: February 3rd - 12th. Training includes online self-study and discussion participation and a live webinar on February 12th.

    A group of youth with different disabilities laugh and smile while posing together

    Total time required: 8-10 hours (estimate) over 8 business days, in addition to time to read the Working Well manual.

    Cost: $130 per person. Cost includes a manual in your preferred format.

    Registration deadline: January 20.

    How to register: Complete the brief form Working Well February 2020 Training Pre-Registration

    After initial registration, you will receive an email containing a training schedule, a training overview, and the link with instructions to finalize your registration and payment.

    Once you’ve registered, you should also have your agency review and agree to the Organizational Licensing Agreement, which is found here: Working Well Organizational Licensing Agreement


    How long is the Facilitator Training? What do I have to do?

    A man using a power chair works on a computer at a raised computer desk.

    The Working Well facilitator training is a self-guided online training held over the course of eight business days. It includes reading and use of the facilitator manual, review of recorded videos, participation in an online discussion forum, and attendance of one live webinar.

    In order to become a certified Working Well with a Disability Facilitator, each participant is responsible for the following:

    • Reading the Working Well manual
    • Viewing the pre-recorded training sessions
    • Posting responses to discussion questions and activities in the discussion forum on five training days
    • Participating in the live webinar session

    Total time estimated for this training is about 8-10 hours, in addition to the time to read the Working Well manual. Each day’s video is about an hour or less, and the live webinar on Friday February 12 is 1.5 hours. You may set your own daily schedule for reading, viewing videos, and posting to the discussion forums.


    What is Working Well with a Disability?

    Working Well with a Disability is a 6-week peer-facilitated workshop that builds on the content of our successful Living Well with a Disability curriculum and considers health in the context of employment. Participants learn skills to maintain life balance, manage stress, and improve their health in support of looking for or maintaining employment.

    This facilitator training will prepare individuals to host Working Well with a Disability workshops. We recommend that trainees facilitate their first consumer workshops within 3 months of receiving their facilitator’s certification. See How to Become a Working Well Program Provider for more information.


    Have questions or want to know more about the facilitator training or Working Well with a Disability?

    Email Krys Standley (krysti.standley@mso.umt.edu ) for more information.


    Continue reading about Working Well with a Disability facilitator training: register now!

    Find SCI resources on the Rural Disability Resource Library

    Looking for spinal cord injury resources? Check out the Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center posts on the Rural Disability Resource Library, RTC:Rural’s information website. There you can find links to some fantastic resources to support individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and burn injury.

    https://youtu.be/KHSy1B184qU

    The Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center (MSKTC) works to make sure the latest and best research findings are being used in healthcare decision-making. In order to help improve the health and quality of life of people with spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and burn injuries, MSKTC creates resources and products that share relevant research findings with the people who need this information.

    Continue reading about Find SCI resources on the Rural Disability Resource Library

 

What does RTC: Rural do?

RTC: Rural is a leader in research on disability in rural communities. Visit our About page to learn more.