University of Montana Rural Institute

Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities – RTC: Rural

Main Hall University of MontanaThe Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities (RTC: Rural) conducts research on disability as part of the Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities at the University of Montana. RTC: Rural is funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) to improve the ability of people with disabilities to engage in rural community living.

Research projects at RTC: Rural focus on community participation and independent living, health & wellness, and employment and vocational rehabilitation.  Research products include: Living and Working Well with a Disability, health promotion programs for people with disabilities; Telecom Toolbox, a resource for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors; and the Transportation Voucher program available from the Association of Programs for Rural Independent Living (APRIL).

As a NIDILRR-funded program, the Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities strives to ensure people with disabilities participate in all stages of the development and implementation of research projects.  Our goal is to make sure research results and products are useful and relevant to people with disabilities, their families and service providers.

Learn more about RTC: Rural, our staff and history by checking out our About Page .  Please like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.


    Resource Maps that Promote Health

    mobile phone with gps map application

    mobile phone with gps map application

    Community resource maps are a great tool for consumers who want to learn how their environment can support their health.  RTC: Rural recently completed a research project that focused on Personal Community Resource Mapping, a process that helps consumers develop a road map to better health.  Using this system, consumers analyze their own communities, the places they go and the people they see, and use a map to create a picture, set goals and solve problems.

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    ADA 25: Reflecting on Inclusion

    Rural Institute Staff at Americans with DIsabilitys Act bus tour

    Rural Institute staff at Missoula ADA 25 celebration.

    The Americans with Disabilities Act turned 25 on July 26th.  Communities, organizations and individuals across the country have been celebrating this important milestone in the months and weeks leading up to the anniversary.  But while the ADA has made great strides toward full inclusion of people with disabilities in all areas of life, there is still much work to be done.

     

    UniversalEntrance-Payne

    The Payne Family Native American Center has a universally accessible front entrance.

     

    For example, the "built environment" is one easy way to see how far we've come since passage of the ADA.  Take a look at your own community and the places you frequent.  Where are the accessible entrances?  Are they on the front of the building or tucked around back?  New buildings, such as the one pictured at right, often feature universally accessible front entrances that allow everyone access through the main entrance.  This is one example of full inclusion in the built environment.

    Continue reading about ADA 25: Reflecting on Inclusion

 

What does RTC: Rural do?

RTC: Rural is a leader in research on disability in rural communities. Visit our About page to learn more.